This site is sponsored by Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers Call us toll-free to discuss your case: (888) 424-5757

Basic Accommodations Can Help Disabled Children Enjoy ‘Normal’ Childhood Fun

disabled children can enjoy play areas as wellWhat child does not enjoy going to the park? Sliding down a whirlpool slide at the community pool? Playing bumper cars with their siblings and friends? These are just a few of the questions parents of disabled children are asking themselves, and the community.

Due to many different motor and sense difficulties that disabled children go through due to their diseases (such as cerebral palsy), it is difficult for them to play as other children do. The simple act of hitting a ball or playing catch can prove tiresome and almost impossible for disabled children.

These children deserve a ‘normal’ childhood just like any other child, and efforts must be undertaken by the community and the government to increase accommodations for disabled children.

With the development of parks and recreational facilities that are devised specifically for disabled children, these children can enjoy the fun activities that other children their age do every day.

Playing at the park similar to physical therapy

In a sense, this would prove to be a form of physical therapy for the disabled children. If they were able to move around and play in an area that was created for them specifically, with safety concerns and proper equipment adhered to, disabled children would be able to have an almost normal childhood.

The playing and the physical exertion would most likely help these children develop both physically and mentally. Being able to play in an area with little or no help from others would no likely boost their confidence and levels of self-respect.  As the world around them begins to make sense, they will begin to feel love and respect for those around them.

A disabled child will have, at one moment or another, felt isolated and different. No matter how hard a parent tries to make their child’s life comfortable and happy in the home, the outside world will always prove to have challenged the child must overcome.

Due to the fear of these obstacles and challenges, parents of disabled children are much more hesitant to let their children interact with others in outside facilities. With the development of basic accommodations in public parks and centers, parents have the safe option of bringing their special child outside.

Basic Accommodation in Parks

Many states around the US have begun to incorporate special swings and slides for children with disabilities in local parks. Although these may seem like basic changes, the excitement and joy a disabled child feels when they are able to fly on a swing in unimaginable.

Slowly but surely changes are being made to public areas around the US. Parents of disabled children are still vying for an increase in basic accommodations for the ease of their children. Communities and governments must be pushed to incorporate fun and useful areas for these children.

The development of such accommodations has proved to be quite costly, but through the help of fundraisers, communities, local businesses and interested parents, the changes have been successful.

Living with a disability is difficult enough for a child. Giving a disabled child the chance to enjoy ‘normal’ childhood fun would be the gift of a lifetime.

Reference:

Article Tags

athetoid cerebral palsy, birth injury lawsuit, birth injury lawsuits, cerebral palsy cases, cerebral palsy lawsuit, cerebral palsy lawyer, cerebral palsy settlement, compressed umbilical cord, emergency c section, fetal distress, fetal heart rate, fetal hypoxia, fetal monitoring, hearing problems, hyperbilirubinemia, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, incontinence, jaundice, lack of oxygen at birth, low apgar score, medical expenses for cerebral palsy, medical malpractice lawyer, medical negligence, meningitis, mixed cerebral palsy, occupational therapy, oxygen deprivation at birth, pain and suffering, pediatric neurologist, physical therapy, placental abruption, premature babies, premature birth, recreational therapy, risk factors for cerebral palsy, seizures, severe cerebral palsy, signs of cerebral palsy, speech therapy, standard of care, stiff muscles, surgery for cerebral palsy, symptoms of cerebral palsy, umbilical cord prolapse, vision problems